Hey there. My name is Faiz and I am 21 years old. I don't really care for astrology, but I'm a taurus and I like being associated with the bull. I love American Football and I root for the New England Patriots. My favorite bands are Dir en grey, Radiohead, Tool, and Rush. I like Man of Steel, Watchmen, Fight Club, The Social Network, Casino Royale and the like. I have a love hate relationship with video games and some of the ones I have enjoyed the most or am currently playing are mass effect 2, fallout 3, the witcher, san andreas, resident evil 4, and dead space.

20th April 2014

Link reblogged from Hardcore with 12 notes

‘Man of Steel’ Review | Modern Myth Media →

thankyoulordforhenrycavill:

‘Man of Steel’ Review 

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‘Man of Steel’ Focuses on the Man and Makes Him Super In the Process

I’ve always preferred Batman to Superman. Identifying with the last son of Krypton is perpetually hard for me because I view his stories as less about the man and more about the world’s reactions to him. Sure, I like him, but I’ve never felt as if understand him in the same way I do Bruce Wayne.

That changed with Man of Steel, a film that strips the Super from the Man to focus on his lifelong search for identity and purpose only for him to find that he’s always known exactly who he is and what his purpose is. Once he embraces this knowledge, he literally soars to greatness.

This catharsis is excellently embodied by Henry Cavill. I found his powerful, yet understated performance to be the best portrayal of Superman on film. He carries himself with a natural and intense respect for all life that informs his every action.

This is thrown into masterful contrast by Michael Shannon’s terrifyingly sympathetic portrayal of General Zod, a righteous zealot who will stop at nothing to rebuild a twisted version of his own culture. Shannon brings menacing gravitas to every scene he’s in (as well as a few that he’s not in) and is the personification of the old saying, “Every villain is a hero in his own mind.”

Their conflict is eloquently and succinctly put into perspective with a question posed to Superman by his father Jor-El, played with contemplative urgency by Russell Crowe. “What if a child dreamed of becoming something other than what society had intended? What if a child aspired to something greater?”

It’s in examining the dichotomy of the purpose for which these two men exist that the film’s exploration of this central question of identity becomes something truly special.

You have Zod, whose purpose, preservation of Kryptonian society above all else, defines his identity. When that purpose is rendered obsolete, he is left with nothing.

And then you have Superman, whose identity as an adopted human being defines his purpose as protector of the race that cared for him.

Superman’s eventual triumph over Zod (not a spoiler, you didn’t really think Zod was coming out of this the winner, did you?) is the ultimate vindication of his father’s belief that individual self determination is more important and worthwhile than a predetermined destiny.

Though the central conflict of ideologies between Superman and Zod is tasked with carrying much of Man of Steel’s weight, the film’s supporting cast superbly shares the burden, rounding out the edges of Superman’s world in exemplary fashion.

Amy Adams’ Lois Lane strikes a perfect balance of assertiveness and affability, consistently conveying a vulnerable strength that makes her an equal worthier of Superman’s affection than the damsels in distress of old. Adams and Cavill share a natural chemistry that is assisted by an able script that demonstrates an insightful understanding of who these two characters are. When their friendship evolves into a romance, it feels both earned and earnest.

A lot of credit must also be given to the two young actors bringing Clark Kent to life at ages 9 and 13, Cooper Timberline and Dylan Sprayberry, respectively. Their acting ability shined in their heartbreaking portrayals of a boy forever alone and in conflict between his astonishing nature and the necessity of concealment. Such emotion is conveyed in these early scenes with them and Jonathan and Martha Kent (Kevin Costner and Diane Lane) as to connect you with the man Clark becomes. His identity is as much a product of their upbringing as anything else.

Honorable mentions to Christopher Meloni as Colonel Nathan Hardy and Antje Traue as (marry me?) Faora. Meloni’s role is representative of humanity’s understanding of and response to Superman, and he acquits himself in admiringly heroic fashion. Traue makes the most of every second of screen time afforded her, from a deliciously evil sizing up of Superman upon their first meeting, to a silent and crushing despondency at the destruction of her world.

Director Zack Snyder (Watchmen, Dawn of the Dead) has turned in a phenomenal piece of filmmaking, complete with the kind of fast paced action he has become known for.

The only aspect of the film that seemed a bit off to me was its rather muted color palette. While that didn’t detract from my enjoyment of the film, I couldn’t help but think that the film looked as if Zack Snyder borrowed Christopher Nolan’s crayons.

Such a palette worked well for The Dark Knight Trilogy, with its grounded approach to Batman, but in a film that placed more emphasis on the fantastic, I feel a more vibrant color would have served the story better. Being familiar with some of Snyder’s other more prismatic works, I got the feeling that this was more Nolan’s influence than anything else.

For Man of Steel 2, let Zack Snyder be Zack Snyder. This film shows he can be trusted with the keys. Give him the room to make the Superman film that he wants to make. I’d really like to see that film, and I get the feeling he was held back a little here.

In spite of this minor gripe, Man of Steel combines a touchingly human core story with gripping performances, fantastic visuals, dynamic action, and an intriguing approach to the Superman legend based in science fiction, heralding an impressive and satisfying return for its eponymous hero.

Welcome to the 21st Century, Man of Tomorrow.

Source: thankyoulordforhenrycavill

20th April 2014

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exercise. need more fucking exercise. fuck.

20th April 2014

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lynch - adore

20th April 2014

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20th April 2014

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What Man of Steel Can Learn From The Winter Soldier →

iamnotdoinganything:

fox-ridge7:

reviewsection:

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Take Steve Rogers—arguably the most straight-edged “nice guy”— who runs around wearing the flag of his country punching Nazis in the jaw, and drop him into a modern context. We live in a confusing time, far more confusing then the days when we had Hitler to point at as a pillar of evil….

Good Lord just stop. Superman is not a brooding character. Unlike steve he is not human, he’s an alien from another planet and grew up having to hide his powers because he could literally kill someone if he slipped up. This lead him to be a loner because of his powers. He doesn’t destroy metropolis, Zod does. You would know this if you bothered to pay attention to the film. He doesn’t brutally murder Zod he is left with no choice but to permanently stop the last of his kind. Superman has killed plenty of times in the comics and each time he felt remorse for what he did and he did the same in Man of Steel. Superheroes are hardly ever put into ideal situations, to bitch about Superman being put in a situation where he has to choose between the last of his kind or human life is ridiculous. He doesn’t crash into populated areas because he wants to, he tries to take the fight elsewhere but seeing as how he’s fighting experienced soldiers while he himself has never been in a fight means he’s not in control. The kryptonians beat the crap out of him a lot because they are stronger in the areas of experience, training, and knowledge. He doesn’t mope around the whole film he’s trying to find answers of where he comes from and who he is, something that should not be hard to understand. Superman was raised by humans he is just like us, he’s been said to be the most human of us all by batman. And we as humans have times where we have doubts and times when we fail. He’s not a tragic character he’s an example of someone who has had a hard life and rises above it, that is someone who people can aspire to. There is hope in the movie, since you were too blind when you saw it let me point out a few; first theres Kal himself being sent off into space from a dying world, there’s the battle of smallville where thanks to Kal the kryptonians retreated even though he’s completely outmatched he still manages to force them to leave, and there’s the part where he is being forced down by the world engine, a device that is literally making him weaker the closer he is to it, yet stands up and destroys it. Man of Steel showed that you can overcome things that seem impossible, like Kal fighting the kryptonians despite the fact that they’re stronger, it shows us the inherit good in people when Clark’s bully offers him a helping hand, or when Perry stays with Jenny instead of running from the kryptonian ship, ready to die with her so she doesn’t have to die alone and afraid. Man of Steel doesn’t need to learn anything from winter soldier because it already has it’s own lesson to teach. You on the other hand should learn who Superman is as a character and how to actually tell what makes a movie so amazing.

fox-ridge7 text porn much. Haha.

But I agree with your points, the motivation behind the behaviors of the two characters are very different. One is a roided-up super human, and the other is literally a God.

The maker of that post obviously had a shallow perspective of both films because he tried to compare them with parallel points.

Different characters, different situations, different stories to tell.

All I can say is: Man of Steel is a good film that depicts what would literally happen when Gods would make earth a Battle Ground. Captain America the Winter Soldier: “Bucky is all grown up and has stereotypical unmotivated angst syndrome, and wants to hurt me”

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20th April 2014

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19th April 2014

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19th April 2014

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notnoisetoy:

Why is life so hard?

19th April 2014

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keep fuckin walkin you postman piece of shit

keep fuckin walkin you postman piece of shit

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19th April 2014

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prettylittlekittygirl:

keviinmeow:



omg

prettylittlekittygirl:

keviinmeow:

image

omg

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